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Monday, 6 September 2010

Faith and Science

It seems that several scientists feel a desperate need to attack faith and those who believe that there is something bigger than humanity and guiding creation. Richard Dawkins and his cohorts are now joined by none other than Stephen Hawking, whose latest book states that "God is not necessary for explaining the origins of the universe." My first reaction was - "so what?" Then it struck me; these men seem to be going out of their way to "prove" that God does not exist.

That raises the question: Why? Why are they so determined or desperate to prove there is no God?

This desperation on the part of the Humanist/Atheist faction seems to me to be driven by two things. The first is fear and the second is hatred. What are they afraid of? That they might, at the end of the day, have to face the consequences? Or, more likely, that the religious among us may, at some stage reject them and their philosophy altogether, which, I suspect, is much more likely. The hatred is more difficult to pin down, though it sees to be directed primarily at Christianity. Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism and anything not 'Western' doesn't come in for anything like the criticism directed specifically at Christian beliefs.

Sadly, as they now control academia, all the histories are being re-invented to tell a story that shows Christianity as an aggressive, acquisitive and totally corrupt philosophy. Anything good about Christianity, such as its influence on morality, law and the fostering of knowledge and even the sciences these men and women practice, is played down or presented only in a negative light. The Roman Catholic Church is a target for a special venom - worthy of Cromwell, Knox and Calvin themselves - and, sadly, all churches and church related matters are painted in the same light.

The sad thing is that the 'conflict' between science and faith is the invention of those on the extremes of both science and religion. The reality is that, for the majority of people of faith, Christian and others, is that science informs our faith and does not conflict with it.

Professor Hawking's book leads me to ask the question of those who say they have no belief in God and reject religion in favour of the Humanist belief that man is his own invention: What hope does this offer to those born in poverty, without the hope or the means to rise out of that in this life? What hope does it offer those whose lives are cut short in service of these 'Humanist' ideals of the 'greater good' of mankind? What does it offer those, crippled like Professor Hawkins, but without either the money, support and the intellect to do as he has? To these and millions more Humanism and its god of material gain offers nothing. Nothing but the short, grinding poverty of emptiness in this life and then that's it. Tough luck brother, I got it all and you got zilch. Your problem, your fault.

On balance, and in defiance of the likes of Professors Dawkins and Hawking et al, I prefer to live in the hope offered by a belief that there is a God. He may not have actually lit the blue touch paper of the Big Bang, but I do believe he had a hand in it and in the millions of tiny events that all had to come together - randomly in the Humanist belief - to ultimately create even an amoeba. I prefer to believe in the hope of the resurrection - an historical event if you actually care to study things more than superficially, and track down the testimony of some who lived at that time - gives me that I may, in due season and at God's time, live in a more perfect world and in the company of all those I have loved and who loved me.

I cannot prove there is a God, but then I cannot prove why the division of cells in a fertilised ovum eventually becomes a living, breathing animal or human. I can tell you that the moment it dies, there is a noticeable difference as can anyone who has been in attendance at a deathbed. But then, neither Professor Dawkins, nor Professor Hawking can tell you that either.

I cannot prove there is a God, but then the Humanists can't prove there isn't. Perhaps that is why they hate Him so much.

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