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Monday, 19 December 2011

International Suicide?

One of the many great tragedies in South Africa occured during the 1850s and was known as the "National Suicide of the AmaXhosa." At that time, the British ruled the territory occupied by the AmaXhosa, the area between the Great Fish River and Pondoland, the latter now a part of KwaZulu Natal. There had been numerous clashes between the British and Dutch settlers and the AmaXhosa (In reality three major groups with a shared language.) who were being driven south westward along the fertile coastal area by the expansion of the AmaZulu peoples to their north east. All these tribes were, at that time, primarily herdsmen who moved frequently, had little in the way of "settled" territory or "towns" as a European would recognise them and depended on gathered fruit and small crop planting for food.

The "National Suicide" arose because, following yet another clash with British Army units over cattle raids into the "White" territory, a young woman had a "vision" that the ancestors were angry, but would help the tribe if they all destroyed all their cattle and planted no crops. The Sangomas, perhaps to cover their bets, backed up her story. It was believed that the slaughtered cattle would be restored and multiplied, that the warriors would be made invincible and immune to the bullets of the whiteman and so the scene was set for a tragedy. The missionaries desperately attempted to intervene. The Cape Governor was petitioned and sent troops laden with supplies - but it was all to late. No one really knows, even now, how many died in this folly, after all, much of it happened in areas the white man had not reached, not even as a missionary.

So why does this story come up in my memory at this time? I guess it's the combination of having watched and read to much on the subject of the latest "Climate Change" Jamboree in Durban and the constant witterings of the likes of Greenpeace, Fiends of the Earth, Oxfam et al about how the "developed nations" must slash their power usage or change economical and sensible generation - which, thanks to innovation and improvements, has been getting cleaner and greener for the last 40 years - to inefficient, expensive and noisy windmills, solar panels that use only 13% of the energy they absorb and pay a massive "tax" into a redistribution "fund" to "help" "developing nations" take over the nasty business of manufacturing all these nice "green" technologies. The final straw for me was listening to a Greenpeace "expert" wittering on about how "shipping is the most polluting form of transport available" and should pay a tax to "mitigate" the "damage" moving the world's goods from manufacturer to buyer or from raw material supplier to manufacturer.

Her reasoning sounded to me exactly like the fairy tale vision of the young Xhosa woman. Destroy the devloped economies, move their industries and their jobs to "devloping" countries and you'll be "rewarded" with clean countrysides, clear skies and the Anthropomorphic Climate Utopia that exists only in the minds of those who believe all the propaganda and spin put out by Greenpeace et al on the subject of the climate and the natural cycles.

The trouble is, if we are not careful, we will go the way of the tribesmen who fell for the "vision" and did as they were told. Western economies are in trouble already. We cannot afford to throw moeny into a nebulous "vision" dreamed up by a bunch of well intentioned idiots raised on the diet of "we're all gonna die unless we unilaterally disarm." Now that threat has receded, they've found another. Equally nebulous, equally preposterous and equally self destructive.

Let's hope the politicians currently pandering to this can be brought to see sense before it's too late.

1 comment:

  1. Nice story.

    Unfortunately our nit wit Politicians all have $$$ for eyes and think they will get RICH from betraying their countries little realizing it is paper money backed only by the productivity of the countries they are intent on demolishing.

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